Session topics

Session topics and conveners are listed in alphabetical order.

  1. Computational ecohydrology (merged with Integrated hydrologic models)
  2. Computational modeling of cold regions processes
  3. Coupling free flow and porous media flow to capture multi-scale complexity of hydrological interactions
  4. Flow, transport and deformation in fractured rock
  5. Geochemistry coupled to flow and other processes across different scales and interfaces
  6. Groundwater modeling
  7. Integrated hydrologic models: challenges, advances and perspectives
  8. Machine learning and data-centric simulations
  9. Marine hydrodynamics and related phenomena
  10. Modeling water flow and contaminant transport in soils
  11. Multiphase flow and transport in porous media: from pore-scale mechanisms to field-scale predictions
  12. Multiphysics and domain decomposition methods
  13. Subsurface storage of energy and fluids (merged with Groundwater modeling)
  14. Transport and reaction across scales in hydrological systems
  15. Transport processes in rivers (merged with Integrated hydrologic models)

1. Computational ecohydrology

This session has been merged with the session Integrated hydrologic models.

Conveners:
Suiliang Huang (Nankai University, China)
Arash Massoudieh (Catholic University of America, USA)
Tomasz Okruszko (Warsaw University of Life Sciences, Poland)
Jan Vanderborght (Forschungszentrum Jülich, Germany)

Ecohydrology is a multi-disciplinary subject that focuses on the interactions between hydrology, hydraulics, and biota. The functioning of ecohydrological systems is determined by heterogeneity and spatial-temporal structures present at different spatial scales. Computational methods can represent the impact of these structures and heterogeneities, help us better understand the behavior of ecohydrological systems, and provide us with a tool to predict the effects of natural or anthropogenic changes on them. This session is intended to highlight new numerical and mathematical methods and tools in the field of ecohydrology. We encourage the submissions of abstracts that describe recent advances in tools applicable in studying mutual interactions between the hydrologic cycle and ecosystems. We welcome a wide range of studies, including but not limited to those involving utilization of advanced numerical and mathematical tools to explain field and laboratory data, making predictions on the impacts of natural and human-induced changes, data assimilation, remote sensing concerning interactions between hydrology and ecology.

2. Computational modeling of cold regions processes

Conveners:
Elchin Jafarov (Woodwell Climate Research Center, USA)
Malgorzata Peszynska (Oregon State University, USA)
Ryszard Staroszczyk (Institute of Hydro-Engineering PAS, Poland)

Hydrological processes in cold regions such as the Arctic and Antarctic include the migration of fluids in land and sea ice as well as in permafrost regions. They involve many scales and coupled phenomena including thermal, mechanical, and biological processes, and thus their many aspects present challenges to computational modeling. In addition, the inputs and outputs of the models are linked to global climate, emphasizing the importance of validation efforts, but the data is less available than for temperate zones. This session will feature presentations emphasizing the specific challenges of computational modeling in cold regions with the goal to refine and improve the state of knowledge about these.

3. Coupling free flow and porous media flow to capture multi-scale complexity of hydrological interactions

Conveners:
Rainer Helmig (University of Stuttgart, Germany)
Vahid J. Niasar (University of Manchester, UK)
Amir Raoof (Utrecht University, The Netherlands)
Kathleen Smits (University of Texas at Arlington, USA)

Considerable effort has been devoted to characterizing components of the hydrological cycle using a wide range of modeling and observation systems across spatial scales ranging from soil pores to continents. Observations from remote sensing, in-situ networks and laboratory experiments provide independent constraints on model simulations, and also inform upon key processes and parameters within the model environment. This session invites contributions that seek to evaluate, integrate or merge observation with theoretical and modeling systems of the free flow and porous media flow at all scales to better describe the hydrological cycle as well as groundwater-river interactions. This session will report on: (1) recent advances in measurement and modeling of land-atmosphere and surface water-groundwater interactions at all scales, (2) nascent efforts addressing knowledge transfer between spatial scales and experimental methodologies. (3) Upscaling the interface phenomena across spatial and temporal scales.

4. Flow, transport and deformation in fractured rock

Conveners:
Inga Berre (University of Bergen, Norway)
Vittorio Di Federico (University of Bologna, Italy)
Bernd Flemisch (University of Stuttgart, Germany)
Eirik Keilegavlen (University of Bergen, Norway)

An understanding of the hydraulic, mechanical, thermal and chemical behavior of fractured formations is crucial to the success of techniques aimed at resources recovery, geothermal exploitation, carbon sequestration, soil remediation and waste disposal. Fractures in geologic media are natural hotspots as they often govern the transport properties of geological formations of low conductance, while occupying a small percentage of the total formation volume. Vice versa, the geometry and properties of fractured systems are sensitive to mechanical alterations induced by flow processes. The challenges inherent in the characterization of such complex subsurface environments have motivated the development of laboratory and field approaches aimed at quantifying the physical and chemical properties of fractured rocks. Modeling and simulation of single and multiphase flows in fractured systems, as well as conservative and reactive solute transport, pose no less challenges as the system displays heterogeneity at multiple scales, is plagued by uncertainty, and affected by nonlinearities associated with Forchheimer effects and non-Newtonian fluid rheology. Poromechanical effects, including fracture deformation, introduce further complications.
We welcome contributions addressing physical, chemical, and biological processes and their coupling by means of analytical, computational, or experimental approaches, with special emphasis on interdisciplinarity. This session also invites presentations on testing and validating new measurement methods, upscaling and imaging techniques, uncertainty analysis and surrogate models related to fractured rocks.

5. Geochemistry coupled to flow and other processes across different scales and interfaces

Conveners:
Holger Class (University of Stuttgart, Germany)
Malgorzata Peszynska (Oregon State University, USA)
Sorin Pop (Hasselt University, Belgium)
Florin Radu (University of Bergen, Norway)
Brent Sleep (University of Toronto, Canada)

Bio-geo-chemical reactions are essential components of coupled flow-transport systems involving water resources. These reactions may alter the domains, as well as the properties of the flow processes, and can be considered at multiple scales, including the pore- and Darcy scales. This session will focus on mathematical modelling and computational challenges, as brought on by processes like mentioned above and the coupling between them. The special interest will be in novel models, including non-standard processes and interactions, including multiphysics couplings, and in numerical schemes addressing such challenges. Contributions with a particular focus on applications and their specific backgrounds and challenges are also welcome.

6. Groundwater modeling

Conveners:
Jesus Carrera (IDAEACSIC, Spain)
Beata Jaworska-Szulc (Gdańsk University of Technology, Poland)
Chunhui Lu (Hohai University, China)
Gualbert Oude Essink (Deltares, The Netherlands)
Oliver Schilling (University of Basel, Switzerland)

A large part of the global population relies on safe fresh groundwater supplies for domestic, agricultural and industrial purposes. As groundwater modeling is a principal tool to better understand and manage groundwater in a sustainable way, it is of critical societal relevance. The need for robust, efficient, reproducible models is even more urgent today, as groundwater systems worldwide suffers an unprecedent stress from increasing abstraction and contamination, climate and land use changes, as well as the competitive uses of the subsurface (e.g., urban development, mining, hydrocarbon extraction, waste storage, aquifer thermal energy, etc.). Furthermore, aquifers along coastal zones and at islands are under threat from saltwater intrusion and sea level rise. Significant research efforts are directed to address challenges such as heterogeneity and uncertainty in aquifer parameters, assimilation of diverse data from various sources and integration of explicit, physically-based groundwater modelling into a broader framework of hydrological models.
In this session, we welcome submissions describing the development and application of new computational methods to simulate the movement of water, heat and mass in groundwater systems. We are interested in the use of novel computer-based approaches for a broad range of topics, including but not limited to the impact of climate and land use change on groundwater resources; the interaction of groundwater with streams, lakes and wetlands; vulnerability and risk analysis (especially for emerging pollutants); managed aquifer recharge; land subsidence related to groundwater abstraction; saltwater intrusion; and submarine groundwater discharge.

7. Integrated hydrologic models: challenges, advances and perspectives

Conveners:
Matteo Camporese (University of Padua, Italy)
Alexandra Gemitzi (Democritus University of Thrace, Greece)
Stefan Kollet (Forschungszentrum Jülich, Germany)
Clément Roques (University of Neuchâtel, Switzerland)

Providing accurate predictions of the dynamics of hydrological systems under evolving natural and anthropogenic stresses requires that numerical models account for complex coupled processes occurring at interfaces between atmosphere, vegetation, geology and anthropogenic activities. Recent advances in integrated hydrological modeling technologies have pushed the boundaries of exploring those critical processes covering a wide range of spatial and temporal scales. With recent developments in innovative data assimilation and hybrid data-model machine learning techniques, we have seen new perspectives to inform numerical models and improve prediction accuracy.
This session aims at bringing together an interdisciplinary community working on integrated modeling of water resources to discuss: 1) advances in the description of natural- and human-induced physical and biochemical processes in integrated numerical models; 2) novel data assimilation methodologies for short- and long-term predictions (e.g., from remote sensing products to crowdsourced observations); and 3) scientific discoveries drawn from integrated hydrological simulations on future evolution of hydrological systems that are important in the development of sustainable management strategies. Furthermore, we seek contributions that provide solutions for the engagement of stakeholders, such as enhanced visualization, web services and applications, and augmented and virtual reality functionalities. Finally, we solicit ideas and opinions on future challenges in the development and application of integrated hydrological models.

8. Machine learning and data-centric simulations

Conveners:
Valentina Ciriello (University of Bologna, Italy)
Monica Riva (Politecnico di Milano, Italy)
Daniel Tartakovsky (Stanford University, USA)

The rapid expansion of monitoring networks delivering high-resolution real-time measurements has generated widespread interest in data assimilation and, more generally, interplay between data and mathematical models. A manifestation of this interest is the rapid growth in the use of data assimilation methods (e.g., ensemble Kalman filters and Bayesian approaches) and machine learning techniques (e.g., deep neural networks and random forests) in water resources research dealing with the environment, energy, climate, public health, etc. These and other fields of research rely on science-based predictions that combine integrated multidisciplinary models and data of different types and spatiotemporal resolutions. Data assimilation and machine learning provide two promising venues for the fusion of data and models and for the quantification of uncertainty inherent in the predictions. Our session targets contributions related to advances in data assimilation and machine learning methodologies, with a special focus on data integration in hydrology, and to their applications in water resources research.

9. Marine hydrodynamics and related phenomena

Conveners:
Jaromir Jakacki (Institute of Oceanology PAS, Poland)
Jens Murawski (Danish Meteorological Institute, Denmark)
Rafał Ostrowski (Institute of Hydro-Engineering PAS, Poland)
Dominic Reeve (Swansea University, UK)
Grzegorz Różyński (Institute of Hydro-Engineering PAS, Poland)

Hydrodynamic processes constitute a wide spectrum of physical phenomena in the marine and transitional waters, e.g. surface waves and currents of various origin, which cause the transport of sediments and other substances, as well as contribute to the evolution of shoreline and seabed. It is necessary, apart from identification of the underlying phenomena, to be able to predict and assess different interactions occurring in those regions. In situ measurements, despite all their merits, have serious limitations. Due to the variety of spatial and temporal scales and the impacts of external factors, theoretical description of these phenomena needs to be implemented by numerical models, built on a solid foundation of computational methods and approaches. The models ought to be accurate, efficient, robust and reliable. Their applications include numerous studies in the realms of ocean and coastal engineering. Often, the associated research activities incorporate interdisciplinary approaches, overlapping with many scientific disciplines, such as ecology, economy, geology, meteorology and climatology. Recent investigations and modelling of the marine environment must take into account the sea level rise and other issues related to climate changes, like processes in sensitive polar regions. This session encourages submissions covering computational algorithms, model coupling, multi-scale implementation and applications of numerical models dealing with marine hydrodynamics and related processes.

10. Modeling water flow and contaminant transport in soils

Conveners:
Giuseppe Brunetti (BOKU University, Austria),
Diederik Jacques (SCK▪CEN, Belgium),
Laurent Lassabatère (LEHNA, ENTPE, France),
Jirka Šimůnek (University of California – Riverside, USA)

Modern human society has created an unprecedented number of chemicals that often find their way into the environment. Industrial and mining activities are releasing varieties of pollutants to surrounding environments. A broad range of fertilizers, pesticides, and fumigants are now routinely applied to agricultural lands. Agriculture also increasingly uses a variety of pharmaceuticals and hormones in animal production many of which, along with pathogenic microorganisms, are being released to the environment through animal waste. Since many of these chemicals represent a significant health risk when they enter the food chain, contamination of both surface and subsurface water supplies has become a major issue.
Mathematical models are critical components of any effort to optimally understand and quantify site-specific subsurface water flow and solute transport processes. Models can be helpful tools for designing, testing, and implementing soil, water, and crop management practices that minimize soil and water pollution. Models are equally needed for designing or remediating industrial contamination sites, waste disposal sites and landfills, or for long-term risk management of nuclear waste repositories, mining areas and groundwater polluted by industrial activities. A large number of specialized numerical models now exist to simulate the different processes at various levels of approximation and for different applications. These models are often coupled with advanced statistical methods, such as Bayesian inference and surrogate-based analysis, to quantify their predictive uncertainty in a computationally efficient manner.
This session welcomes contributions on recent advances in numerical modeling of the physicochemical (hydrogeological, geochemical, and microbiological) processes affecting the fate and transport of subsurface pollutants (ranging from organic pollutants, heavy metals, and radionuclides to pathogens and nanoparticles), including model calibration, uncertainty assessment, and surrogate-based analysis. Investigations of emerging contaminants are especially welcome. We encourage broad participation bridging traditional research areas, including groundwater, vadose zone, groundwater-surface water interactions, stochastic hydrology, biology, chemistry, and soil physics.

11. Multiphase flow and transport in porous media: from pore-scale mechanisms to field-scale predictions

Conveners:
Branko Bijeljic (Imperial College London, UK)
Yves Méheust (University of Rennes 1, France)
Insa Neuweiler (Leibniz University Hannover, Germany)
Jacek Pozorski (Institute of Fluid Machinery PAS, Poland)

Predicting multiphase and multicomponent flow and transport processes in porous media remains an open challenge with direct implications on a number of environmental, industrial and biological processes, including the infiltration of water through the vadose zone, the contamination of underground water bodies by non-aqueous phase liquids (NAPLs), geologic CO2 and hydrogen storage, enhanced oil recovery, transport and biochemical controls on microbial activity in the subsurface, or the formation and dissociation of methane hydrates in permafrost regions and in ocean sediments. Moreover, multiphase, multi-component flows in porous media lie at the heart of current challenges in the emerging energy technologies, such as geothermal energy systems, unconventional hydrocarbon resources, and functioning of batteries, fuel cells and other electrochemical devices.
Conventional continuum-scale models often oversimplify important pore-scale fluid flow and transport mechanisms, such as wetting and capillarity effects, fluid-fluid interface displacement regimes, mechanical dispersion and its interaction with molecular diffusion, the coupling to chemical reactions and biological processes, or the impact of medium heterogeneities at the pore scale. In addition, multiphase flow is often viscously or gravitationally unstable, and mass transfer between fluid phases can result in non-trivial phase behavior. How such phenomena would manifest in continuum scale models is an open question. Model inaccuracies lead to uncertainties when applied to field-scale operations. On the other hand, it is not feasible to apply the first principle models for two-phase flow in porous media to most of the real world large scale problems mentioned above. Predictions of relevant flow processes with conventional continuum scale models is challenging in itself not only because of model inadequacy, but also due to the complexities associated both with numerical solution and the spatial structure on multiple length scales.
In this session we wish to bring together experimental and modeling studies that address these challenges, including experimental techniques, numerical simulation tools and theoretical approaches. We invite in particular contributions allowing modeling and better upscaling the pore scale processes mentioned above to continuum scale models. We are especially interested in submissions that characterize the rich phenomenology of multiphase flows from the pore scale and up, using either experimental or numerical approaches, as well as offer alternatives to and discussions on the limitations to conventional continuum-scale models. We also welcome studies addressing deformable porous media and the interaction between multiphase flow and the deformation of the solid phase.

12. Multiphysics and domain decomposition methods

Conveners:
Wietse Boon (KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden)
Jan Nordbotten (University of Bergen, Norway)
Ivan Yotov (University of Pittsburgh, USA)

Both natural and anthropogenic materials are often composed of regions with different characteristics, either in terms of the relevant physical processes such as multiphase flow, mechanical deformations or reactions, or in terms of the material properties. As such, handling both multiphysics problems, as well as the interface between domains described by potentially different sets of governing equations, is of high and persistent relevance.
In this session, we aim to bring together contributions on both the analysis as well as computational methods for such problems, recognizing the fact that many of the same challenges and solution strategies are relevant both for the multiphysics, as well as the spatial, couplings.

13. Subsurface storage of energy and fluids

This session has been merged with the session Groundwater modeling.

Conveners:
Anozie Ebigbo (Helmut Schmidt University, Germany)
Sarah Gasda (NORCE Energy, Norway)
Sebastian Geiger (Delft University of Technology, The Netherlands)

The subsurface can be used for the storage of fluids and/or energy. Energy storage is typically seasonal and hence creates short-lived but significant changes in reservoir behaviour; energy can be stored in the subsurface in the form of heat, compressed air, or fuels such as hydrogen or methane. Waste products from nuclear energy may also be disposed of in the subsurface. Further, large-scale underground carbon dioxide (CO2) storage is an important technology for the reduction of atmospheric greenhouse-gas concentrations. In these cases, storage must be secure for climate-relevant timescales − CO2 storage − or for millennia − radioactive waste disposal. Considering the large uncertainties inherent to geological formations in the subsurface, the scarcity of directly measured data, and the large spatial and temporal scales involved in these applications, numerical simulations are necessary in planning subsurface storage projects, e.g. to answer questions regarding storage capacity, efficiency, and optimisation, or address risks such as induced seismicity or leakage. Such simulations require the accurate and efficient modelling of multiphase flow, solute and heat transport, and geochemical processes across spatial and temporal scales and need to account for various uncertainties to provide sound techno-economic assessments of subsurface storage solutions. This session is open to contributions from a broad range of research areas, proposing innovative concepts for computational methods that address fluid flow and coupled processes related to subsurface storage.

14. Transport and reaction across scales in hydrological systems

Conveners:
Marco Dentz (IDAEACSIC, Spain)
Sergi Molins (Berkeley Lab, USA)
Veronica Morales (University of California – Davis, USA)
Delphine Roubinet (University of Montpellier, France)

Physical and chemical heterogeneity control dispersion, mixing and reactive transformations across a broad range of spatial scales in hydrological systems. In turn, chemical reactions may affect flow through density and viscosity variations, and through changes in medium properties driven by dissolution, precipitation, clogging or fracturing. The aim of this session is to discuss new experimental, numerical, and theoretical approaches to quantify transport, reaction, and mixing phenomena and associated feedback processes, in porous and fractured media. This includes reactive transport in saturated and unsaturated porous media, heat transfer, multiphase and variable density flows, bacterial transport and biofilm growth, as well as biogeochemical fluxes in streams and catchments.

15. Transport processes in rivers

This session has been merged with the session Integrated hydrologic models.

Conveners:
Andrea Marion (University of Padua, Italy)
Roger Moussa (INRAE, France)
Paweł Rowiński (Institute of Geophysics PAS, Poland)

Numerical modeling of transport processes in surface waters poses a real challenge and presentations related to new findings in the field are welcome. The transport of constituents and heat by dispersion, advection or other processes is dependent on hydrologic and hydrodynamic characteristics of a channel under consideration and they in turn depend on the geometry and morphometry of the river reach. The more geometrically complex the setting is, the more uncertain is the mathematical representation of the system. If we also consider the presence of vegetation along river channels, the transport processes become particularly difficult to describe. We realize that all transport process in aquatic environment are governed by water flow itself, so all the problems related to the water movement under steady and unsteady conditions (as transport of momentum) are of interest as well.
We are also interested in the inherent uncertainties. Among others the reliable estimation of model parameters becomes extremely difficult and can be a source of large uncertainty and related discussions will definitely raise interest. Various optimization techniques and AI methods can be discussed in this context. We seek presentations on relevant numerical models from relatively simple 1D towards more complex 3D unsteady flow models and the analyses of associated numerical errors.